Professor of Professor of Anthropology, Paul Stoller, on how anthropology can rise to the “profoundly humanitarian…

Professor of Professor of Anthropology, Paul Stoller, on how anthropology can rise to the “profoundly humanitarian obligation” to address inequality and climate change:

“Given the political, social and ecological crisis we face, anthropologists are uniquely positioned to demonstrate in clear and concise language and image, how market fundamentalism, which generates climate change, social inequality, racism and the defamation of difference, has brought us to the social precipice. By moving from passive to active voice anthropologists, among other cultural critics, can provide the insightful information needed to construct a groundswell of change -a course correction on a path to social apocalypse.”

http://buff.ly/1LPXofV #anthropology #socialscience

8 thoughts on “Professor of Professor of Anthropology, Paul Stoller, on how anthropology can rise to the “profoundly humanitarian…


  1. I agree, but I think that the social question is transverse. At the macro – level, Is necessary the evolvement of a lot of institution.


    Personally, I agree on the idea that social and enviromenal scientists have an “humanitarian obligation”. However, their influence on the political system is uncertain because of many factors (…) than here is the key. The informations must run and be filtered, semplified for the social micro-level, the common people living in the lucky part of the Earth. They have the power to urge the pressure to the high level of government. The Humanitarian obligation is for all the social actors.


    In the path of this concern and then for its complementary aims, an international ONG “Survival” raised and operates in defense of the alived tribal communities, it’s active in the protection of the right of auto determination and in protection of their settlements.


  2. I agree, but I think that the social question is transverse. At the macro – level, Is necessary the evolvement of a lot of institution.


    Personally, I agree on the idea that social and enviromenal scientists have an “humanitarian obligation”. However, their influence on the political system is uncertain because of many factors (…) than here is the key. The informations must run and be filtered, semplified for the social micro-level, the common people living in the lucky part of the Earth. They have the power to urge the pressure to the high level of government. The Humanitarian obligation is for all the social actors.


    In the path of this concern and then for its complementary aims, an international ONG “Survival” raised and operates in defense of the alived tribal communities, it’s active in the protection of the right of auto determination and in protection of their settlements.


  3. Hi Federica T.T. Thanks for your comment! Agree that all people have a humanitarian obligation. Professor Stoller’s point is about bringing the social sciences out of academia into applied contexts. Rather than simply documenting or critiquing issues of inequality and climate change, he’s asking us to address practical solutions. Very inspiring!


  4. Hi Federica T.T. Thanks for your comment! Agree that all people have a humanitarian obligation. Professor Stoller’s point is about bringing the social sciences out of academia into applied contexts. Rather than simply documenting or critiquing issues of inequality and climate change, he’s asking us to address practical solutions. Very inspiring!

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